bean + bourbon

Ever finished a book? I mean, truly finished one? Cover to cover. Closed the spine with that slow awakening that comes with reentering consciousness?

You take a breath, deep from the bottom of your lungs and sit there. Book in both hands, your head staring down at the cover, back page or wall in front of you.

You’re grateful, thoughtful, pensive. You feel like a piece of you was just gained and lost. You’ve just experienced something deep, something intimate… Full from the experience, the connection, the richness that comes after digesting another soul.

[…]

It’s no surprise that readers are better people. Having experienced someone else’s life through abstract eyes, they’ve learned what it’s like to leave their bodies and see the world through other frames of reference. They have access to hundreds of souls, and the collected wisdom of all them.

Beautiful read on why readers are, “scientifically,” the best people to date

Perhaps Kafka’s timeless contention that books are "the axe for the frozen sea inside us" applies equally to the frozen sea between us. 

(via explore-blog)

Anonymous said: You're being so ignorant with your tweets. Hobby Lobby is a company that isn't going to support something they do not believe in. They aren't saying for people to not use birth control or any types of birth control. They just don't want to be the ones allowing it through their insurance. The company is being bashed for doing what they believe in while ignorant people like you get upset about it. If you don't agree don't work for them. It's simple

dynastylnoire:

thelolahaze:

macepoints:

slackmistress:

Point one:

Hobby Lobby is a corporation. Corporations get certain benefits that people don’t: tax breaks, protection from criminal charges being filed, etc.

If Hobby Lobby would like to be a PERSON WITH RELIGIOUS BELIEFS, then Hobby Lobby should not get the protection of a corporation.

Point two:

If Hobby Lobby had the courage of their religious convictions, they would not:

If you are a human in the United States, it should not be up to your boss to decide what medicine is appropriate for you to take. It should be up to your doctor. Yes, and insurance company could deny you, but YOUR BOSS SHOULD NOT HAVE ANY DECISIONS WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR HEALTH CARE.

Point three:

Hobby Lobby is totes cool with vasectomies and erectile dysfunction drugs.

Point four:

One of the points people up is that Hobby Lobby doesn’t want to cover the Morning After Pill because it’s abortion. Except that the Morning After Pill ISN’T ABORTION. The Morning After Pill delays or inhibits ovulation. IT PREVENTS PREGNANCY. This is science. But maybe you think gravity is a myth, too.

Point five:

Christian Scientists and Jehovah’s Witnesses* traditionally do not believe in medicine. So I imagine you ‘re okay with a business run by someone who practices these faiths to not cover your mom’s chemo, or your diabetes medication, or a blood transfusion for your child. (*Edited to add: Jehovah’s Witnesses believe in medicine, just not blood transfusions. Thanks to annelangston for the clarification.)

Point six: (bonus round!)

I appreciate that you are so confident of your convictions that you are willing to put your name on your…oh wait. You’re anonymous.

#DrHobbyLobby prescribes taking up cross-stitch. May I recommend this one?

image

(image from YarnBombing.com)

Important. 

she could have stopped at point 1, really. the est is just icing, sprinkles, and a candle. 

especially sprinkles and candle

chrisburkard:

By far the Raddest form of transportation has to be a floatplane… 

 (at Deep in the heart of the PNW)

chrisburkard:

By far the Raddest form of transportation has to be a floatplane…

(at Deep in the heart of the PNW)

(via coffeeinthemountains)

explore-blog:

The Pilot and the Little Prince – beloved illustrator Peter Sís tells the bittersweet story of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

"He lived in a wooden shack and had few belongings and fewer visitors. With an ocean on one side and desert everywhere else, it seemed like one of the loneliest places in the world. But he loved the solitude and being under millions of stars."

explore-blog:

The Pilot and the Little Prince – beloved illustrator Peter Sís tells the bittersweet story of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

"He lived in a wooden shack and had few belongings and fewer visitors. With an ocean on one side and desert everywhere else, it seemed like one of the loneliest places in the world. But he loved the solitude and being under millions of stars."

explore-blog:

I submit that this is what the real, no-bullshit value of your liberal arts education is supposed to be about: how to keep from going through your comfortable, prosperous, respectable adult life dead, unconscious, a slave to your head and to your natural default setting of being uniquely, completely, imperially alone day in and day out.

May 21, 2005: David Foster Wallace delivers his legendary Kenyon College commencement address on the meaning of life, later published as This Is Water. Hear the full speech and see the transcript here.

Dwell on the beauty of life. Watch the stars, and see yourself running with them. Marcus Aurelius  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: panatmansam, via onceuponamanda)

Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need nothing.
Strong and content I travel the open road.

Walt Whitman

The greatest American poet

(via greaterthanexpected)

(Source: greaterland, via greaterthanexpected)

Once in a while it really hits people that they don’t have to experience the world in the way they have been told to. Alan Keightley (via greaterthanexpected)

(Source: psych-facts, via greaterthanexpected)

The incident is particularly unsettling for two reasons: At its root is a testament to what a cruel and indiscriminate predator depression is, capable of consuming even humanity’s greatest minds, yet the uncompassionate response illustrates just how poorly we understand the condition. Above all, however, embedded in the media’s treatment of Virginia’s suicide is a grotesque reminder that the only thing more morally repugnant than passing judgment on another human being’s private struggle and inner world, than choosing self-righteousness over compassionate understanding, is doing so publicly, and in the commercial media. What a spectacular failing of the awareness that it’s far more rewarding to understand than to be right.

March 28, 1941: Virginia Woolf’s suicide letter and its cruel misinterpretation in the media (via explore-blog)

"What a spectacular failing of the awareness that it’s far more rewarding to understand than to be right."

I don’t know why we long so for permanence, why the fleeting nature of things so disturbs. With futility, we cling to the old wallet long after it has fallen apart. We visit and revisit the old neighborhood where we grew up, searching for the remembered grove of trees and the little fence. We clutch our old photographs. In our churches and synagogues and mosques, we pray to the everlasting and eternal. Yet, in every nook and cranny, nature screams at the top of her lungs that nothing lasts, that it is all passing away. All that we see around us, including our own bodies, is shifting and evaporating and one day will be gone. Where are the one billion people who lived and breathed in the year 1800, only two short centuries ago?

Alan Lightman, MIT’s first professor with dual appointments in science and the humanities and author of the immeasurably brilliant The Accidental Universe, considers our longing for permanence in a fleeting universe, something a different Alan – Watts – contemplated with equal, timeless poignancy half a century ago

More of Lightman’s singular mind and spirit here.

(via explore-blog)